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Batavia Chiropractor | Batavia chiropractic care | OH | DAILY HEALTH BENEFITS

TEECE CHIROPRACTIC

Dr. John Teece

Dr. Paul Teece

Business Hours
Monday:8:00am-11:45am, 2:00pm-5:30pm
Tuesday:By Appointment
Wednesday:8:00am-11:45am, 2:00pm-5:30pm
Thursday:By Appointment
Friday:8:00am-11:45am, 2:00pm-5:30pm
Saturday:Closed
Sunday:Closed
 

 

DAILY HEALTH BENEFITS

 

Friday, September 22nd, 2017
Courtesy of:
Dr. John Teece
 
 
Mental Attitude: Chronic Illness Can Lead to Despair Among Young Adults. Young adults with a chronic disease such as asthma or diabetes are more than three time as likely to attempt suicide. Researcher Dr. Mark Ferro writes, “Evidence suggests risk for suicide attempts is highest soon after young people are diagnosed with a chronic illness. There is a critical window of opportunity for prevention and continued monitoring.”  Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, August 2017
 
Health Alert: Over 50% of Americans Will Need Nursing Home Care. A new study suggests that more than half of Americans will find themselves in a nursing home at some point during their lifetime. Lead researcher Dr. Michael Hurd notes, “Lifetime use of nursing homes is considerably greater than previously thought, mostly due to an increase in short stays of less than three weeks.” The findings suggest that families need to financially plan for nursing home care as they become older, and society needs to prepare to assist families that cannot afford nursing home stays.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, August 2017   Diet: High Salt Intake Doubles Heart Failure Risk. Too much salt can significantly increase the risk of heart failure. In a new study, researchers followed more than 4,600 people for twelve years and found that those who consumed more than 2.5 teaspoons of salt per day had a two-times greater risk for heart failure than those with a diet lower in sodium. Currently, the World Health Organization recommends that adults consume no more than one teaspoon of sodium per day, or about 2,300 mg. Researcher Dr. Pekka Jousilahti explains, “High salt [sodium chloride] intake is one of the major causes of high blood pressure and an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke… The heart does not like salt.” European Society of Cardiology, August 2017
 
Exercise: May Reduce Risk of Bladder Cancer… A review of data from 42 studies published since 1996 indicates that engaging in regular physical activity may reduce one's risk for developing bladder cancer by 11-34%. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, October 2017
 
Chiropractic: Resistance Training Beneficial for Low Back Pain. A recent study investigated the effects of functional resistance training on fitness and quality of life in women with chronic nonspecific low-back pain. After completing a twelve-week functional resistance training program, investigators observed that the women experienced significant reductions in pain and disability, as well as improved health-related quality of life, balance, and physical fitness. Doctors of chiropractic commonly recommend patients engage in regular exercise, including functional resistance training, as part of the recovery process for spinal conditions like chronic back pain.  Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, August 2017
 
Wellness/Prevention: Poor Sleep Increases Musculoskeletal Pain the Next Day. Among a group of 67 adolescents with acute musculoskeletal pain, researchers found that self-reported pain scores increased in the mornings following nights with either short sleep duration or low-quality sleep. Because the researchers did not observe that higher pain scores in the evening led to sleeping trouble, the results suggest that strategies to improve sleep could reduce the effect of musculoskeletal pain on one's daily living. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, August 2017
 
Quote: “Run when you can, walk if you have to, crawl if you must; just never give up.” ~ Dean Karnazes